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Getting Exercise

  • Exercise: Before Starting an Exercise Program

    It is always important to talk with your doctor before starting an exercise program, particularly if you have certain health conditions.

  • Designing an Exercise Program

    To improve your heart and lung fitness, aim for 30 to 60 minutes of aerobic exercise three to four times a week.

  • Risks of Physical Inactivity

    Lack of physical activity has clearly been shown to be a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

  • Have a Hearty Workout for Your Heart

    Unlike other muscles, your heart muscle does not tire from use. Your heart is like other muscles, however, in that it needs exercise to work efficiently. What kind of exercise would that be? All it takes is a brisk 30-minute walk most days of the week.

  • Strength Training and Heart Disease

    If you think that you can’t begin a strength-training program because you have heart disease, think again.

  • Exercise Your Way to a Healthy Heart

    Physical inactivity is just as big a risk factor for heart disease as high blood pressure and smoking are. So, be the exception rather than the rule. Here are eight ways to exercise for a healthier heart.

  • How Much Exercise Is Enough?

    A private advisory group's call for 60 minutes of physical activity each day are in line with the 2005 USDA Guidelines for exercise of 30 to 60 minutes. The new advice was meant to get people moving, but some experts are worried about recommending 60 minutes.

  • Exercise Goals for Healthy Living

    You know it's important to stay active but still find yourself falling back on old habits. What can you do? Planning for exercise isn't hard if you make it a priority.

  • Exercise for the Seriously Unfit

    You can't walk across a room without huffing and puffing. Your arms get tired unpacking a bag of groceries. You're carrying more and more excess body weight. And you can't remember the last time you got any real exercise.

  • Stay Fit When You Have a Health Challenge

    Working out when you have a serious illness or health problem can be challenging. But for most people who have health issues, exercising can improve their prognosis and well-being. In fact, exercise can play an important role in helping you cope with or recover from a health challenge or accident.

  • Prime Times to Exercise

    Your exercise time can depend on everything from your work schedule to when your kids get up or go to bed.

  • Maximize Your Exercise Time

    To keep yourself entertained and enthused, wear headphones and listen to high-energy music while you work out.

  • Bench These Six Exercise Excuses

    Some excuses—I weigh too much, I'm too old, I have too many health problems—are in themselves strong arguments for increasing physical activity.

  • Fitness Goals Provide Motivation

    Whether you want to run a marathon or just start exercising regularly, having a goal is an important tool.

FYH

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